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Aggies gathered together for the 19th Bonfire Remembrance in the early hours of November 18. Bonfire Remembrance is held to honor the 12 students who lost their lives when the bonfire stack collapsed on November 18, 1999 at 2:42 a.m. 

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In the cold early morning hours of Sunday when campus is usually deserted, hundreds of Aggies will make their way to the Bonfire Memorial to remember the 12 Aggies who died after the stack collapsed at 2:42 a.m. on Nov. 18, 1999.

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A tree is growing for each Aggie lost during the Bonfire collapse.

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The Bonfire Memorial stands as a monument to the 12 who died during the Bonfire collapse in the early hours of Nov. 18, 1999. Nineteen years after the collapse, the memory of this event is still preserved by the Aggie community.

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Aggies gathered at the Bonfire Memorial in the early hours of Nov. 18 for a ceremony held in honor of the 12 students who lost their lives when stack fell in 1999.

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On November 18, 1999 at 2:42 a.m. the Bonfire stack collapsed. 12 Aggies passed that night and it is the duty of Aggies everywhere to keep their memory alive in our hearts. We remember them.

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Current and former students gather in the brisk morning cold at 2:42 a.m. to remember the 12 Aggies that fell during Bonfire collapse in 1999. But as the ceremony continues, some minute changes may be noticed.

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The 1969 Bonfire (right) at Texas A&M University was the tallest bonfire ever built. Reaching nearly 110 feet into the air, it was taller than most current buildings on campus, and in 1969 it was the tallest structure on campus. In the 1940s, when Universal Studios produced the film abou…

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The Aggie Bonfire was one of Texas A&M’s longest standing traditions. Usually done before the annual football game against the University of Texas. The tradition ran on campus from 1907 until 1999, when a tragic collapse resulted in 12 deaths and 27 injuries.

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Tragedy struck when, 18 years ago, Bonfire collapsed, killing 12 Aggies and injuring 27 others. This event instantly reshaped a 92-year-old tradition and changed Aggieland in ways nobody could have expected when that fateful night began.

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The Battalion Assistant Life & Arts Editor Skye Lovelady sat down with Ann Goodman, associate director of the Department of Student Activities, who was one of the first people contacted when Bonfire collapsed on November 18th, 1999 at 2:42 a.m., to discuss her job and what she saw during…

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Aggieland gathers once more on the 17th anniversary of Bonfire's collapse, we take this time to remember not just the pain of losing our fellow Aggies but to reflect upon the lives they lived and the happiness and lessons they left behind for each and everyone of us. These Aggies were commit…

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I was appointed to the Journalism faculty in January 1999 as a lecturer and faculty adviser for The Battalion. Bonfire fell the following November. My wife, Mary Sherwood, was a doctoral student. We lived in a one-bedroom apartment just off campus near the intersection of George Bush Drive a…

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Will Hurd, R.C. Slocum & professors describe the collapse and its aftermath

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Five years after the Stack collapse which took the lives of 12 Aggies, the Bonfire Memorial was opened on campus as a place to honor the victims of the tragedy.

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The off campus organization Student Bonfire began their first day of work in the woods on Sunday September, 11th. With Axes in hand and a burning passion in heart hundreds of Aggies headed out to put in their fair share of work. The road to burn night will be long and paved with blood, sweat…

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Sixteen years ago, 12 students died and 27 were injured in a tragedy that continues to be felt across Texas A&M. The 1999 Aggie Bonfire Collapse may have ended campus Bonfire, but a family member of one of the students who died that morning continues the tradition as a member of Student …

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The Battalion published the above front page hours after the 1999 Aggie Bonfire Collapse the morning of Nov. 18. While the final casualty count numbered 12 dead and 27 injured, The Battalion’s day-of coverage reflected the chaos and uncertainty surrounding the tragedy in its immediate afterm…

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Prior to the 1999 Aggie Bonfire Collapse, Bonfire was lit every year since the tradition began in 1909 with the exception of the Bonfire in 1963.

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“From the outside looking in, you can’t understand it. From the inside looking out, you can’t explain it.”

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The Bonfire Memorial on Texas A&M’s campus is set in stone, but 12 trees planted next to it stand as living, growing monuments to the students who died the morning of Nov. 18, 1999.

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Bonfire Memorial was designed as an everlasting symbol to A&M’s greatest tradition, and tragedy. Student leaders reflect on symbolism inherent throughout the memorial.Photos by: Alexis Will

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Twelve students died and 27 were injured the morning of Nov. 18, 1999, when the annual Aggie Bonfire collapsed at 2:42 a.m. The Stack was built over the fall semester by students who managed all aspects of the physically-demanding, complex construction project.

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One of the oldest and most respected traditions within the Student Bonfire organization are their safety helmets, better known as “pots.”

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Fifteen years after the 1999 Aggie Bonfire Collapse, students and community members gathered at Bonfire Memorial at 2:42 a.m. Tuesday to honor the lives of the 12 Aggies killed in the collapse.

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The morning of the 1999 Aggie Bonfire Collapse was the day she grew up, said Sallie Porter, fall semester 1999 editor-in-chief of The Battalion. Porter, who is now a nurse anesthetist living in Asheville, N.C., said each November is, more than anything, a time of remembrance.

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In the days following Nov. 16, 1907, the sleepy campus in what would eventually become College Station was buzzing. The football team was undefeated and, upon returning home on a long train ride after beating national powerhouse Tulane in New Orleans, needed a way to celebrate.

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Aggie Bonfire was born from the Aggie Spirit. Motivated by a strong desire to show their love for Texas A&M, cadets burned the first Fightin’ Texas Aggie Bonfire to celebrate a football victory. As the tradition grew, the spirit stayed the same.

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Five to seven thousand wooden logs, close to 70,000 spectators and 92 years of tradition.