Kyle Field Tunnel

The Texas A&M football team runs onto the field before taking on the LSU Tigers.

There’s no other way to put it. No, 22 A&M’s 74-72 victory over No. 7 LSU on Saturday was the greatest game in college football history — no matter what side of the ball you were on. Here’s what we learned:

History was made

One of few games with seven overtime periods and the highest scoring game in FBS history, 1,017 yards of combined total offense, and 146 combined points. This game was pandemonium. From the 84 points scored in OT to Texas A&M fans storming the field — which will cost A&M a pretty penny — this  game was everything a college football fan could hope for.

Mond proved his wisdom

Mond proved  his wisdom

Whether it was running the ball and losing yardage, throwing it out of reach or mishandling a snap, there were times in the game when A&M sophomore quarterback Kellen Mond made questionable choices.

However, this game proved that Mond has matured way beyond his years in his first season under head coach Jimbo Fisher’s offense. In high-pressure situations it can be easy for a young quarterback to make a major mistake due to inexperience.

Following the game, Fisher said Mond’s confidence never wavered, even when the Aggies were down to their final play.

“He never lost poise,” Fisher said. “Even if he made a bad play, [Mond] said, ‘I got you, I got you.’ We have plays set from the 5, the 10, the 15 and from the 20 [yard lines]. We work on those as the last plays of the game all the time. … [I told him] make sure you give us a chance, make sure you get set in the pocket and make sure you get it to the end zone. He did that and he threw a strike.”

Rogers is there when A&M needs him most

In the four quarters of regulation, A&M sophomore wide receiver Kendrick Rogers was targeted once for a 22-yard catch. In overtime, Rogers had five of the biggest catches of his career, all of which resulted in points, including the game- winning reception on a two-point conversion attempt.

Rogers, who has been battling injuries this season, said heading into this week, the team’s focus was on preparation.

“I was really just locked in, so it really wasn’t like a blur,” Rogers said. “I was just mainly focused on doing my job and doing what it took to win the game.”

Williams made up for fumbling

Given the way the game ended, it might be easy to forget that A&M junior running back Trayveon Williams fumbled the ball at the start of the fourth quarter to tie the game at 24-24. In the seven overtime periods, Williams was given the ball 10 times. Although Williams didn’t score in overtime, he did set up the Aggies up for success in the following plays. In fact, all but one of the A&M touchdowns in overtime were pass plays.

Williams said all that mattered was the team’s ability to win despite the adversity they faced throughout the game.

Fisher is shifting the culture

TV announcers during the Clemson game said they could see the culture and program changing before their eyes.

Saturday proved that while the season was an up and down roller coaster, A&M football will be a force to be reckoned with in the future.

Fisher said the game was a testament to the players buying into the culture he wants to instill.

“The determination, the desire, the toughness, the effort, the discipline, the pride and everything they have — it makes you understand what that Aggie helmet means, and hopefully we are getting to that standard and growing from that,” Fisher said.

Angel Franco is a telecommunication media studies senior and sports editor for The Battalion.

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