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Bike-wise Aggies

University police raise bicyle-safety awareness

Published: Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Updated: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 00:10

Bike male

Tanner Garza

Junior mechanical engineer major Olin Boyd rides his bike away from the bike racks Monday night outside of the MSC. Students are advised to lock their bikes properly at racks available on campus in order to avoid bike theft.

Bike female

Tanner Garza

Freshman Blinn Team student Grace Wilson rides her bike away from the bike racks Monday night outside of the MSC. Students are advised to lock their bikes properly at racks available on campus in order to avoid bike theft.

As student enrollment in Texas A&M increases, so does the amount of cyclists. With a higher density of bicycles on the campus, public safety is of greater concern.

Students are not aware of the fact that general traffic rules also apply while riding bicycles. Reckless riding on the bikes could turn these two-wheeled machines into dangerous vehicles and could even result in fines.

Lt. Allan Baron of the University Police Department said he hopes all cyclists obey traffic laws when riding bikes on campus.

The intersections of Joe Routt Boulevard and Throckmorton Street and Ireland Street are the two most common locations where citations are issued for
bicycle violations.

Some of the most common types of violations committed by cyclists is failure to observe stop signs, failure to use a headlight at night wrong way on a one-way street.

“Both the University police and Transportation Services are making a diligent effort to provide bicycle information to the students,” Baron said. “Students may receive this information at Fish Camp, New Student Orientations, Student Resource Fairs and from news articles in
The Battalion.”

Baron said bicycle thefts equate to about 50 percent of all thefts reported on campus.

One issue of increased bikes on campus is the effect it has on students trying to
get to class.

“Pedestrians have the right of way when crossing and the vehicles must stop when a pedestrian uses the crossing,” said Kristi Hosea, master officer for the University police crime-prevention unit.

In spite of the fact that bicycles do not have engines, they are considered vehicles while on the road.

Hosea said cyclists need to maintain a safe speed while riding and should slow down, especially on turns and curves, and should wear protective gear like helmets.

“True cyclists know the hazards of careless riding and, therefore they take precautionary measures by wearing a helmet at all times,” Hosea said. “Better safe than sorry.”

Monet Maguyon, biology and agricultural engineering graduate student, said awareness about cycling rules need to be enhanced to ensure public safety.

“It is always recommended to wear a helmet,” Maguyon said. “Bike lanes are quite useful. Also, it makes the transportation safer
and hassle-free.”

Maguyon also said it would be a wise approach to wear only one earphone while riding. This will make sure that the cyclist is more responsive toward the surrounding traffic.

 

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